Publications

Akiko Takizawa: Where We Belong | Text by Akiko Takizawa, Paul Thirkell

akiko-takizawa-48.gif.jpeg
1_OsorezanPeople-1-940x622.jpg
1_Trii-on-the-Hill1_300dpi-940x607.jpg
3_Looking-through-the-pamapas-glass-940x632.jpg
3_Where-We-Belong_Collotype-940x629.jpg
8__Goshogawara-Doll-31-940x628.jpg
akiko-takizawa-48.gif.jpeg
1_OsorezanPeople-1-940x622.jpg
1_Trii-on-the-Hill1_300dpi-940x607.jpg
3_Looking-through-the-pamapas-glass-940x632.jpg
3_Where-We-Belong_Collotype-940x629.jpg
8__Goshogawara-Doll-31-940x628.jpg

Akiko Takizawa: Where We Belong | Text by Akiko Takizawa, Paul Thirkell

35.00

Published by Actes Sud/HSBC, 2015
285 x 220 mm, hardcover, 104 pages, 45 colour
ISBN 9782330032203

Add To Cart

A recipient of the 2014 HSBC Prize for Photography, Japanese photographer Akiko Takizawa (born 1971) prints on traditional Japanese paper using a delicate technique called Collotype, working from a studio in Kyoto. This publication documents the artist's return to her grandparents' home in Northern Japan.

"Her practice centers around the 150-year-old Collotype printing process, which originated in France, but has now been all but discontinued on a worldwide level. For the past few years she has worked closely with Benrido in Kyoto, Japan, the last remaining Collotype company in the world, to produce her prints.

Takizawa’s work takes in many themes, which include: home, family, a sense of loss, displacement, death and the afterlife, and what it means to live in the modern world. The majority of her work focuses on her home country, and Japanese culture and traditions feature strongly. For example, in one series, Osorezan (2012), Takizawa explores the Japanese belief that there is not a clear boundary between life and death. The images were taken in Aomori at the north end of the main Island in Japan where people flock from all over the country to ‘connect’ with lost relatives and friends. It is thought that after death, human spirits rise up into the mountains, and at Mount Osore or ‘Fear Mountain’ it is possible to speak to the deceased through a blind shaman. While queuing to see the shaman, strangers often open up to each other and share their stories, says Takizawa.

“I am constantly questioning this modern time we are living in,” Takizawa writes in an artist statement. “I was fascinated by the contrast between Japan as a fast, modern society, which is dominated by high technology and people who live in isolation, and what I have seen in Osorezan – how people secretly believe in such supernatural things, hope to get some answers for their lives, and open up to talk to strangers. By capturing such people in a specific place through photography I hope to understand the world we are living in, and where we belong.” British Journal of Photography online