Publications

The Photograph and Australia | Edited by Judy Annear (secondhand)

Cover 2_0.jpg
Cover 2_0.jpg

The Photograph and Australia | Edited by Judy Annear (secondhand)

30.00

Published by Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2015

300 x 250 mm, hardback, 308 pages, 400 illustrations

ISBN: 9781741741162 

Awards:

Longlisted for the prestigious 2016 Krasna-Krausz Book Awards

Shortlisted for the 2016 Museums Australia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards

Exhibitions & Reviews:

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, March 21-June 8, 2015

Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art, Brisban, July 4-October 11, 2015

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Photography has been crucial in the development of our understanding of Australia as a place and Australians as a people. Tracing the evolution of the medium and its many uses from the 1840s until today, The Photograph and Australia investigates the role that photography has played in shaping Australia's view of the world and of itself.

Sourced from more than 35 private and public collections across Australia, New Zealand and England, the exhibition features works by renowned artists, as well as images by unknown photographers and everyday material such as family albums and postcards. Weaving together the multiple threads of Australia’s photographic history, it proposes a new way of thinking about the connections between photography, place and identity.

Artists include Morton Allport, Richard Daintree, Paul Foelsche, Samuel Sweet, JJ Dwyer, Charles Bayliss, Frank Hurley, Harold Cazneaux, Olive Cotton, Max Dupain, David Moore, Sue Ford, Carol Jerrems, Tracey Moffatt, Simryn Gill, Robyn Stacey, Ricky Maynard and Anne Ferran, among many others.

Judy Annear with contributions by Michael Aird, Kathleen Davidson, Martyn Jolly, Jane Lydon, Daniel Palmer and postscript by Geoffrey Batchen.

Annear does more than bring our attention to a comparatively neglected field; she draws Australia's past and present together by combining historical and contemporary imagery, revealing the extraordinarily diverse history of photography within a uniquely Australian context.  Rosemary Hawker, Senior Lecturer, Griffith University